How will transit continue to meet riders’ needs?

As regional growth expands in an already complex system of communities in Chicagoland, regional transit must evolve to better serve established areas as well as provide new transit options for areas currently not served by transit. Pace is constantly coordinating with the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA), Metra Commuter Rail, Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), and independent transit providers to create the most effective bus transit system possible. The ongoing challenge is providing both efficient local transit service as well as regional connections between communities throughout Chicagoland. Pace’s Vision 2020 Plan sets a course for an innovative multi-layered service model that complements community-based support services. Pace’s Vision 2020 and Arterial Rapid Transit (ART) Initiative identify a variety of layered types of services that collectively provide balanced regional and local mobility.

Transit Collaboration

Pace is committed to using its resources to provide the highest level of bus transit service possible. Where service gaps exist, Pace often collaborates with other transit providers, local municipalities, or stakeholders to share the task of providing effective transit for specific market segments. Vanpools, dial-a-ride, call-n-ride, and local circulator services can be coordinated and funded by different types of service agreements between the entities described above.

Service Types

The level of service provided along any corridor or within a given service area depends on a number of factors, including population and employment density, proximity of existing service, transit and vehicle travel times, congestion, typical transit vehicle dwell times, vehicle ownership, household income and regional travel patterns. In other words, no single measure will determine the type of service Pace provides at an individual location.

The graphics on the following page describe the general characteristics of various types of Pace services that may be implemented, either autonomously or in different combinations, to enhance local mobility. The different types of service may require varying degrees of infrastructure investment such as transit signal priority, bus only lanes, or queue jump lanes. Municipalities and developers should contact Pace regarding planned service along specific corridors and within specific service areas.

Pace-operated Regional Fixed-route Services

Local/Arterial Bus

This includes Pace’s traditional fixed-route service making local stops. Local/Arterial service benefits from direct access to population, employment, and retail densities close to transit stops. Buses make frequent stops, typically every 1/8-mile to 1/4-mile, and provide access to other transit routes, paths, and pedestrian networks.

Local/Arterial Bus

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART)

This includes service on priority transit corridors. ART service is typically used to provide mobility across greater distances than local trips, and stops are located to provide access to local fixed-route service, major activity centers, and other significant ridership nodes. Stops are less frequent, typically every 1/4-mile to 1/2-mile, and include greater infrastructure investment in stations and transit roadways.

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART)

Express Bus Service

This includes routes designed to take advantage of expressways and regional arterials to provide high-speed regional mobility with few stops. These routes are designed to quickly move rider from one portion of the region to another, with limited local stops at park-n-ride facilities or major activity centers. Expressway operations bypass most local or intermediate trips.

Express Bus Service

Pace/Private Partner Flexible Local Service

Local Circulator, Call-n-Ride/Dial-a-Ride

This includes local routes that serve specific community destinations and may be subsidized by local entities or municipalities. These routes typically operate on local streets using smaller vehicles to provide local mobility. They typically require little investment in infrastructure, but provide connections to other local or regional transit services.

Local Circulator, Call-n-Ride/Dial-a-Ride

Carpool/Vanpool Shuttle

This includes carpool or vanpool services initiated by local stakeholders and coordinated through Pace. Typically serving a specific destination, such as an office building or corporate center, the carpool or vanpool shuttle provides mobility for a specific market of riders that cannot otherwise be effectively served by traditional transit.

Carpool/Vanpool Shuttle

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